Category Archives: Alasdair MacIntyre

Secularism & Class Conflict

The key difference between the seventeenth- and the eighteenth-century examples is the consciousness of the emerging autonomy of secular life.  This autonomy is strengthened by the tendency apparent in secular life for economic growth to result in the splitting of

Secularism & Class Conflict

The key difference between the seventeenth- and the eighteenth-century examples is the consciousness of the emerging autonomy of secular life.  This autonomy is strengthened by the tendency apparent in secular life for economic growth to result in the splitting of

Religion & Urbanization

In both the United States and Britain there has been, and there still is, a significant relationship between the size of a given city and the church membership and attendance in that city.  In general the larger the population of

Religion & Urbanization

In both the United States and Britain there has been, and there still is, a significant relationship between the size of a given city and the church membership and attendance in that city.  In general the larger the population of

When Religion Really is the Opium of the People

It must be granted that the Marxist critique holds true for a great deal of religion, and in particular for a great deal of nineteenth-century religion.  The doctrine of the Tractarians, for example, helps to illustrate the critique.  Suspiciously enough,

When Religion Really is the Opium of the People

It must be granted that the Marxist critique holds true for a great deal of religion, and in particular for a great deal of nineteenth-century religion.  The doctrine of the Tractarians, for example, helps to illustrate the critique.  Suspiciously enough,

What Liberalism Rejects

There have long been ample grounds for the rejection of this or that part of Marxism; what is interesting, however, is the way in which the rejection of Marxism normally entails the rejection of the possibility of constructing any view

What Liberalism Rejects

There have long been ample grounds for the rejection of this or that part of Marxism; what is interesting, however, is the way in which the rejection of Marxism normally entails the rejection of the possibility of constructing any view

Liberal Divisions

The bourgeois society of the nineteenth century articulated itself in terms of concepts and beliefs, which, although they took on differing theoretical forms, were all apart of the apparatus of secular liberalism.  Liberalism is the theoretical mirror in which the

Liberal Divisions

The bourgeois society of the nineteenth century articulated itself in terms of concepts and beliefs, which, although they took on differing theoretical forms, were all apart of the apparatus of secular liberalism.  Liberalism is the theoretical mirror in which the

Feuerbach all over again

Nothing has been more startling than to note how much contemporary Christian theology is concerned with trying to perform Feuerbach’s work all over again.  For if Christianity, in even the semi-secular society of the present, is to be able to

Feuerbach all over again

Nothing has been more startling than to note how much contemporary Christian theology is concerned with trying to perform Feuerbach’s work all over again.  For if Christianity, in even the semi-secular society of the present, is to be able to

Religion & Social Change

It was Durkheim who saw that primitive religions present a concept of divinity in which the divine is a “collective representation” of the structure of social life; so that what the members of a society worship is the ensemble of

Religion & Social Change

It was Durkheim who saw that primitive religions present a concept of divinity in which the divine is a “collective representation” of the structure of social life; so that what the members of a society worship is the ensemble of

On Hegel

The three fundamental concepts in Hegel are “self-estrangement” or “alienation” (Selbst-Entfremdung), “objectification” (Vergegenständlichung), and “coming to one’s own” (Aneignung).  “Self-estrangement” is a description of man in his fallen state.  Men are divided against themselves and their fellows.  This division is

On Hegel

The three fundamental concepts in Hegel are “self-estrangement” or “alienation” (Selbst-Entfremdung), “objectification” (Vergegenständlichung), and “coming to one’s own” (Aneignung).  “Self-estrangement” is a description of man in his fallen state.  Men are divided against themselves and their fellows.  This division is